image

You Deserve Better Access
to Quality Eye Care

THE SOLUTION IS CLEAR

Legislation is needed that would expand the range of services that trained Doctors of Optometry across the state can provide - allowing them to perform several additional procedures that treat common conditions of the eye and eyelids. It will mean better access to the best eye care for our patients.

Your Doctors of Optometry

Nebraska’s largest eye care profession includes more than 330 Doctors of Optometry serving in more than 80 communities across the state.

As primary eye care providers, Doctors of Optometry are trained to examine, diagnose, treat and manage disorders that affect the eye or vision. They are an integral part of the health care team, earning their doctoral degree just as dentists, podiatrists and other doctors do. Optometry is one of the only doctoral-level health care professions to require continuing education.


More
Helpful Information

Visit the Nebraska Optometric Association Center for Healthy Vision

Caring for Your Vision
Good Vision Throughout Life
Parents and Educators
Find an Optometrist

facebook Like us on Facebook

twitter Follow us on Twitter

Early Detection and Treatment is Key in Protecting Vision from the Effects of Glaucoma

Glaucoma-Awareness-Month1Glaucoma affects 2.7 million people in the United States and is the second leading cause of blindness, yet understanding and awareness of the disease is low. In fact, 72 percent of Americans don’t know that glaucoma typically has no early warning signs or symptoms, according to the American Optometric Association’s (AOA) American Eye-Q® consumer survey.

Often referred to as the “sneak thief of sight,” glaucoma is a group of eye disorders that can damage the optic nerve and impair peripheral vision. If left untreated, glaucoma can lead to complete loss of sight. While the disease does not have a cure and is not preventable, it is treatable and can be detected in a comprehensive eye exam provided by your optometrist.

“A common misconception is that glaucoma only affects older adults when, in reality, it can happen at any age. In fact, it’s most commonly detected in people in their 40s,” said Dr. Richard Kant, NOA president.

“The key is to identify and diagnose the disease early in order to promptly treat and slow the progression of vision loss.”

 

Click here to read the News Release

Click here to read the Lincoln Journal Star story

 


Keys to Protecting Vision from the Effects of Glaucoma